Tag Archives: soccer

Training Session: Player Development Model from Lake City Hawks Guest Carl

lake-city-hawks
Lake City Hawks 1970-1975

I was reviewing my old posts on this site and stumbled across a great reply that we received from an ex-professional player.  His name is Carl from Seattle.  He included a session broken down by minute from his favorite coach.  Here is a link to the Lake City Hawks Facebook page.  I also discovered that the coach, Walter Schmetzer, Sr., runs a store and skill academy.  Here is a link to that.  And, it looks like from what I saw, that Walter’s son is the coach of the Seattle Sounders.  For all those reasons, and because you just want to learn, read closely what Carl posted:

The Team Training Session Focused on Player Development

Coaches have asked me what an ideal practice looks like if player development, as opposed to team development, is the primary objective. It looks today, as I practice it, just as it did as practiced by Coach Schmetzer–my former youth coach–the most successful coach in developing players to excel in ODP since its inception in 1977. He didn’t coach elite players; he coached ordinary players who became elite.

Before the days of “super clubs,” Coach Schmetzer, a master at player development, who did no recruiting, produced, from a single U18 boys team, the Seattle-based Lake City Hawks, six Washington State U18 ODP team players. Of those, three made the regional team. Of those three, two –at 17 years of age–played for the U19 youth national team. Three of his 18 players turned pro, all before age 21.

What I, who didn’t start playing competitive soccer until U15, learned from him allowed me to represent our country in international play at 17 and play this amazing game professionally at 18.

His brilliance was in his simple approach, as demonstrated here is his typical practice, which can–and should–be used with children as young as 10:

First, before any player arrives, set up the three following areas with a total of 12 cones, 4 for each area:
1) 20yds X 20yds, the “juggling box”
2) 5yds X 20yds, the “skills rectangle”
3) U-12-U-14, 35yds X 35yds or U-15 to U-19, 40yds by 40yds, the 9 vs. 9 “keep-away square.”
These three separate areas should be close to each other.

Second, place practice bibs in a pile in your “rest break” area.
Note: Every player is to have brought his or her own soccer ball, so there’s one ball per player.

Third, when players arrive at practice—even if early—they are to go immediately to the juggling square and juggle.
The first fifteen minutes of a two hour practice is spent juggling.

Fourth, players pair up and go to the skills rectangle. Players are lined up on one side, 5 yards opposite their partner..
Instruct players to do 1-touch passing, back and forth between the two partners. When you estimate each player has made 200 passes, change the drill.
One player tosses the ball to his partner, who traps it with his thigh and then does a trap-pass, using the inside of his foot, back to his skills partner. When each player has done about 30 traps, move on to the next drill.

Tell players that in 60 seconds, they—the pair— are to try to get as many volley-catches back and forth as they can. They’re to count. You tell them you’ll see which pair gets the highest number of successful volley-catches. To start, the players with the ball, in hands, lean over the ball, drop it lightly and, using the instep, volley it to their partner, who attempts to catch the ball with his hands. Each time a pair does this successfully, it counts as one.

Next, the players, with partners standing about four feet from each other, are to head the ball back and forth as many times as they can without the ball dropping.

In the drill that follows, one player, with the ball in hands, tosses it up about 15 feet, and out about 20ft. His skills partner sprints out to the ball, trying to catch up with it to do a trap, using his feet, to turn back toward his partner; once trapped, the ball is passed to the partner who tosses it. This player sprints to the line and his partner tosses the ball again. This drill, which incorporates fitness training, is done for one minute. Players do these as fast as they can.

While this is just a sampling of skill drills, you continue the skills training for 45 minutes before taking a 2-3 minute break, during which time you randomly hand out the nine practice bibs to players who are to put them on before returning for more skill drills. At this point, you are an hour into the two-hour practice.

Fifth, you resume skills training and, again with players pairing up, continue for another 35 minutes.

Sixth, without taking a break, take your players over to the 9 vs. 9 “keep-away” square. Be sure to take 10-12 balls with you in the event some are kicked far away during the game. Your players spend the last 15-20 minutes of practice playing 9 vs. 9.

Here are the instructions:
One team starts the game, anywhere in the square, with a free-kick. No opposing player or teammate may be closer than 10 yards to the player taking the free-kick (a “start” of play or “restart’) at any time in the game. The game is 2-touch soccer. If a player touches the ball more than twice, you blow the whistle to stop the game and the opposing team gets a free-kick to restart the game. Teams score by completing four consecutive passes. If a team gets a point, blow your whistle to stop play. The team that just scored gets to restart the game with a free-kick.

Any time the ball is intercepted (possession is gained) by the opposing team, blow your whistle to stop play. That opposing team, whose players just intercepted a pass and gained control of the ball, now restarts the game with a free-kick. Any player taking the free-kick must, before making a pass to restart the game, look around and behind him (360-degree view). If he fails to do that before making the restart pass, blow the whistle to stop the game, say ”Didn’t look around” and the ball goes to the opposing team for a restart free-kick.

Also, if any player during the course of the game does not know where he is going with the ball before he gets it, then blow your whistle, stop the game and say, “didn’t know where you were going with the ball,” and the opposing team gets the ball for a restart free-kick. If at any time the ball goes out of bounds, a throw-in restarts the game.

Note: While at first there are a lot of stoppages, you will be amazed at how quickly your players pick this up. Plus, as you will see, you are quick on the whistle, which gives players no time to daydream. It’s intense, exceptionally fast-paced and challenging for players.

Once teams are getting four consecutive passes frequently, bump the requirement up to five, then six, seven and eight to score a goal. Once your players have mastered the 2-touch and 8-pass requirement, it’s time for one-touch soccer. Start with three passes equals a goal and follow the same procedure you did for 2-touch, bumping up the requirement of the number of consecutive passes to get a goal.

We Lake City Hawks played 9 vs. 9 one-touch keep-away during the last 15-20 minutes of every single practice, after 1hr. and 35-minutes of skill training, for four years. In my thirty years in the game as a player and coach, I have never seen any single training drill that does more for player development (“game play”) than this one.

The Reason Why

What’s most important for you is to know why such skill training is so effective.

1. First, it’s very efficient. Players arrive at practice and immediately go to the juggling square. During the 15 minutes of juggling, each player will get an average of 600 touches on the ball. Also, by having players do skill drills in pairs—not two lines of nine players
with sixteen standing, watching and waiting to pass the ball—you maximize players’ touches on the ball.

2. Second, you introduce competition (i.e., get as many headers back and forth as you can), and time restrictions (i.e., you are to trap, turn and pass back to your partner, doing these as fast as you can for the next minute), both of which require players to perform at game pace, or as close to game pace as is possible. Thus, players get accustomed to trapping etc. under pressure. Furthermore, you are incorporating fitness into skill drills.

3. Third, it’s effective. In the 1hr and 35-minutes of practice so far, your players have likely gotten at least 3,000 touches on the ball, more than some players get in three or four of their club team practices.
How?

1. It teaches your players the most important facets of the game: to think one step ahead, to consider their options before the ball arrives; they realize the incredible efficiency and effectiveness of 1-2 touch play, so they don’t hold onto the ball too long; they gain an appreciation for the importance of excellent vision, getting the 360-degree look to see the whole field; as they are in such a tight space and have limited touches on the ball, they are forced to make excellent supporting runs for teammates. Furthermore, this game requires a very high level of focus and concentration. It all carries over to actual game play.

2. Also, in 9 vs. 9 keep-away, your players are playing at faster-than-game pace, in an area much smaller than the actual playing field. So when they do get to an actual game, they will have more time and space in which to play.

3. Your players don’t pick up bad habits. The rules and restrictions of the 9 vs. 9 game (and your quick whistle) don’t allow for them. In contrast, in a scrimmage with unlimited touches, full field, etc., players invariably pick up bad habits and these, unfortunately, carry over to the game.

4. In addition, your players will play “purposeful possession,” being patient, smart, willing to play the ball in any direction to maintain possession. There’s no “reckless race” the opponents’ goal.

What’s the Next Step You Can Take for Your Players?

I encourage you to use game time for player development. I have a recommendation that has proved very successful: Impose a 2-touch restriction during actual game play. Before you do, ensure your players have mastered 1-touch play during 9 vs. 9 keep-away. Also, the first time you do this, select any 20-minute segment of play for the 2-touch to start any time after the first ten minutes of the game. Players, of course, can use 1 or 2 touches to play the ball.

Furthermore, tell your players during your pre-game instructions that they’ll be playing 2-touch for that specific 20 minutes you’ve chosen. And all that you ask of each player during that time is that she knows where she’s going with the ball before she gets it. Add that the only time a player may use more than two touches is if she is in the opponents’ penalty area—this should, but it doesn’t always, take care of the inevitable question at least one player asks, “But, coach, what if I’m in front of the goal and need to dribble to take a shot?”

Also, tell your players you’re setting a team goal of six consecutive passes. Why six? They’ll achieve this goal and, regardless of the outcome (score) of the game, will feel a sense of achievement and be eager to try 2-touch again the next time you ask them to. Plus, they quickly become believers of the efficiency and effectiveness of 1- and 2-touch play.

 

Summer Camp Special – Should You Spend the $$$?

This is my annual take on summer soccer camps.  I have spent tens of thousands of dollars on camps through the year – from England to Dynamo to local colleges to UT to LSU to Challenger.  I have 5 kids that all play.  Here is why you should send your kid to soccer camp:

  1.  They will have fun.  I would recommend they go with their friends.
  2. They can develop a greater love of the sport.  Especially if a camp does fun games (like mini-world cups, etc.).
  3. They leave camp with greater confidence in their skills.  This may be because of a lot of positive feedback (some of it unnecessary).  It may be because they get to go against kids much lower than their skill level.  But, if it gives them greater confidence, more power to them.
  4. It is a way for underpaid coaches to make some extra money (and I am for that).
  5. The staff can inspire them to be better players.  A lot of camps use college players or former players, with little coaching experience. Bad for teaching but great for inspiration and role modeling.
  6. If your player is from a recreation program, then the coaching will be great and I highly recommend you go.  If you are part of a competitive club, and have a regular professional coach, you are better off asking for their evaluation and lowering your expectations to 1-5 above.

Why you should not spend the money:

  1. It is expensive.
  2. Their will be no real constructive feedback.  I have learned this the hard way.  Remember, they have your kid for a few days amid a sea of kids.  They are not going to take a close look at them despite anything that they say.
  3. Camp coaches lack accountability to you beyond the week.  Hence, they have no incentive to be honest with you on their assessment.  That is why they do not give a good assessment.  They just want you to be happy so you will come back.
  4. Because they will not deal with you again, or the next week, they really just want the kids to have fun.  They also will not be coaching your kid in any competitive match the following week – they lack any incentive to really dig in.
  5. You are generally dealing with less experienced coaches.  If they are using college players to coach, just know that with rare exception, what you are getting is someone to inspire your kid, not teach your kid.  A few in college are good teachers of the game but, from my experience, it is the exception rather than the rule.  I can tell you I have not seen the top club coaches at any of these camps.  Maybe they coach in their club-camps.  To me, it is like college – if you want a good education, take a class with a good professor.  Same for soccer – if you want your kid to learn and grow, find a coach-teacher who educates, motivates, and inspires.
  6. Camps are revenue makers, not player-makers.

US Youth Soccer and US Club Reach Concussion Settlement – Heading Restricted

I can hear it now … blame the lawyers.  Well, I am one and I applaud the efforts made to affect change.  I have posted many articles and links on this blog regarding the issue of repetitive heading for young players.  You all want to know how lawyers effect change … here you go.

Screen Shot 2015-11-10 at 11.41.34 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here is the link.

Joint Press Statement

Basically…no heading for 10 and under and restricted heading for 11-13.  Love it.

Heading and Brain Damage in News Again

If you have read this blog for any amount of time, you will note that I repost or link to articles discussing the issue with heading in youth soccer.  Many “head trauma” articles as they relate to soccer focus on head-to-head trauma, head-to-ground, or head-to-post.  My experience has taught me heading the ball, particularly punted balls and long kicks, can be painful and damaging.

It all started in my third year of coaching.  I was coaching a U10 boys game in an Academy league that was really nothing more than recreation soccer with more emphasis on results (not a true academy experience — that is another topic).  So, we were playing the best team.  They relied on speed and punted balls to threaten.  Their keeper, likely selected for his punting prowess, punts a ball that is going to cross midfield.  One of our defenders, the biggest, strongest boy on the team, heads the ball.  He immediately gets dizzy, has to come out, and gets sick later.  That experience has shaped my perspective on this topic for years.

While I feel it important to teach proper heading, I discourage heading of punted balls or long balls (or balls at great speeds).  I coach mainly boys who play in the most competitive league in Houston so it can be tough.  But, I recommend this article to all who follow.  While it focuses on girls, my experience is boys head the ball more (yes, their necks are stronger, but still).

And, thankfully, now my U10s play in a true academy league where there is no punting, must play out from the back, and emphasis on passing and dribbling.

Heading In News Again

I love this sport.  I spend a lot of my free time on soccer fields.  I sure hope that we are not too stubborn to consider safety precautions to minimize risk of injury in it.  Remember, the old schoolers complained when shin guards became mandatory.  The old, old schoolers complained when the game changed from kicking the dribbler in the shins (without guards) to proper tackling….just saying.